Teacher Insights: Chocolate, the Right Food to Improve Your Brain Power  |  Leadership Instincts: Strong Bricks Can Be Made from Bio solids and Clay  |  Parent Interventions: Order of Birth in Family Has Influence on Intelligence  |  Cover Story: MIND THE NET  |  Technology Inceptions: Oppo’s 10X Lossless Hybrid Zoom Smartphone Camera Tech to Enter Mass Production   |  Technology Inceptions: AI Can Help Improve Understanding of Earth Science  |  Cover Story: THE CYBER BRAIN  |  Science Innovations: New treatment for osteoporosis   |  Technology Inceptions: SpaceX Protests NASA Launch Contract Award  |  Science Innovations: Cost-efficient catalysts  |  Technology Inceptions: NASA to Launch New Space Telescope in 2023 to Explore Origins of Universe  |  Leadership Instincts: Social Media Cannot Cause Depression  |  Parent Interventions: Maternal Grandmothers Can Raise Survival Rate of Grandchildren  |  Teacher Insights: Waking Up Early No Guarantee for Success  |  Teacher Insights: Ask your girl child to do science, not become scientist  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board

November 22, 2018 Thursday 04:34:34 PM IST
Even dogs seem to know when they don't know!

Researchers at Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History have shown that dogs possess so-called metacognitive abilities, for example, to know when they do not know!

 

Dogs are aware of when they do not have enough information to solve a problem and are found to actively seek more information. The results are published in the journal Learning & Behavior.

 

Researchers at the Dog Studies lab at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History have shown that dogs possess some "metacognitive" abilities -- specifically, they are aware of when they do not have enough information to solve a problem and will actively seek more information, similarly to primates.

 

To investigate this, researchers created a test in which dogs had to find a reward -- a toy or food -- behind one of two fences. They found that the dogs looked for additional information significantly more often when they had not seen where the reward was hidden.

Metacognitive abilities -- sometimes described as the ability to "know what one knows" -- and in particular whether they are aware of what information they have learned and whether they need more information. The results did not allow the researchers to say definitively whether dogs possess metacognition, although they displayed some evidence for it.

"For humans, vision is an important information gathering sense. In this case our experiment was based on a 'checking' action relying on sight -- but the dogs probably also used their sense of smell when checking through the gap. We know that smell is very important for dogs and we could see that they were using it," states Bräuer, one of the researchers on the theme. "In future, we would like to develop an experiment investigating under what circumstances dogs decide to use their sense of smell versus sight. This may give us additional insights into their information seeking abilities."

Source: DOI: 10.3758/s13420-018-0367-5

Comments