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July 12, 2019 Friday 05:17:24 PM IST

E-Tattoo To Monitor Your Heart

Photo Courtesy of University of Texas at Austin

An E-Tattoo worn on the chest developed by engineers at The University of Texas at Austin enables continuous monitoring of heart and provides accurate reading than existing electro-cardiograph machines. 
It is a graphene-based wearable device that is placed on the skin on chest to measure a variety of responses from electrical to biomechanical signals. Powered remotely by a smartphone, the e-tattoo is the first ultra-thin and stretchable technology to measure both ECG and Seismocardiography (SCG). SCG measures chest vibrations associated with heart beats. The synchronous collection of data from both sources gives deeper insight into health of the heart, according to Nanshu Lu of Cockrell School of Engineering, the leader of the project. 
ECG readings do not give an accurate picture of heart's condition but combined with SCG signal recordings it is useful for diagnosis. 
The e-tattoo is made of piezoelectric polymer called polyvinylidene flouride, capable of generating its own electric charge in response to mechanical stress. The device also includes 3D digital image correlation technology that is used to map chest vibrations in order to identify the best location on the chest to place the e‐tattoo.



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