Parent Interventions: Pallikkutam GlobalConnect#4 - Are You Eating the Right Food to Fight Covid-19?  |  Science Innovations: Three-Ply Masks Effective Against Covid-19: Texas Tech University  |  Science Innovations: Natural Rainbow Colours Produced  |  Technology Inceptions: Muscope, World’s Smallest Microscope  |  Science Innovations: Ultrasensitive Tactile Sensors for Robots  |  Policy Indications: How Materials Science Helps Contain Contain Covid-19 Spread  |  National Edu News: IIT Hyderabad and PharmCADD signed a pact for the co-development of new drugs   |  Teacher Insights: Be Game  |  Health Monitor: Understanding ‘Haemorrhage'  |  National Edu News: Pallikkutam GlobalConnect#3 on 'Innovative Tools for Effective Teaching'  |  Expert Counsel: The Nine Dash Line  |  National Edu News: Astronomers Find One Group of Appearing and Disappearing Stars  |  Teacher Insights: Bird Book for Children to Love Nature  |  International Edu News: New Model to Fight Social Media Deep Fakes  |  Teacher Insights: Universal Lunch Makes Students Healthier  |  
July 11, 2019 Thursday 03:18:51 PM IST

Encoded learned behaviour

Teacher Insights

A team of Princeton scientists found that learned behaviours in C. elegans, a nematode, can be conveyed through the germline for multiple generations. (C. elegans is a primitive organism, that shares many of biological characteristics of human biology).Princeton University researchers have discovered that learned behaviours can be inherited for multiple generations in C. elegans, transmitted from parent to progeny via eggs and sperm cells.

It's well known that an organism's characteristics are encoded in genes that are passed down from parent to progeny through the eggs and sperm of the germline. The inheritance of some traits is determined exclusively by whether the individual receives the dominant or recessive form of an associated gene from each parent. Other heritable traits are influenced both by genetic makeup and by factors such as nutrition, temperature or environmental stress, which can affect the expression levels of related genes.

Researchers now found C. elegans can convey learned avoidance behaviour to their progeny. They found that when mother worms learned to avoid pathogenic P. aeruginosa, their progeny also knew to avoid the bacteria. When these modifications are made in germ cells, they can be passed down to future generations in a phenomenon known as transgenerational epigenetic inheritance.


Comments