Guest Column: Collaboration + Research = Global Solutions   |  Teacher Insights: How Digital Technology Helps in Growth and Access to Quality Education  |  Management lessons: How Brands Use CARE to Stay on Top in Instagram  |  Hobbies &Trends: At Full Throttle  |  Finance: Bitcoin Mobile Apps Vulnerable to Security Threats: Guan-Hua Tu, MSU  |  International Edu News: Use plants' ability to tell the time to make food production more sustainable  |  International Edu News: Scientists develop new class of cancer drug with potential to treat leukaemia  |  International Edu News: Loan applications processed around midday more likely to be rejected  |  International Edu News: Researchers find climate change impacts plankton – a key marine food source  |  International Edu News: Nature must be a partner, not just a provider of services – Oxford report  |  National Edu News: Approval to MoU between India and UK on Global Innovation Partnership  |  National Edu News: Transfer of CSIR-CMERI technologies to three MSMEs  |  Parent Interventions: Child Learning Programs: How to Find the Right One for You  |  Rajagiri Round Table: Fitness Challenge for the Nation  |  Education Information: West Bengal Scholarship 2021  |  
July 11, 2019 Thursday 03:18:51 PM IST

Encoded learned behaviour

Teacher Insights

A team of Princeton scientists found that learned behaviours in C. elegans, a nematode, can be conveyed through the germline for multiple generations. (C. elegans is a primitive organism, that shares many of biological characteristics of human biology).Princeton University researchers have discovered that learned behaviours can be inherited for multiple generations in C. elegans, transmitted from parent to progeny via eggs and sperm cells.

It's well known that an organism's characteristics are encoded in genes that are passed down from parent to progeny through the eggs and sperm of the germline. The inheritance of some traits is determined exclusively by whether the individual receives the dominant or recessive form of an associated gene from each parent. Other heritable traits are influenced both by genetic makeup and by factors such as nutrition, temperature or environmental stress, which can affect the expression levels of related genes.

Researchers now found C. elegans can convey learned avoidance behaviour to their progeny. They found that when mother worms learned to avoid pathogenic P. aeruginosa, their progeny also knew to avoid the bacteria. When these modifications are made in germ cells, they can be passed down to future generations in a phenomenon known as transgenerational epigenetic inheritance.


Comments