Trending: Adaptive Leadership in Times of Crisis  |  Teacher Insights: 'Lab in a box' projects for home learning  |  Policy Indications: A global collaboration to move AI principles to practice  |  Science Innovations: Translating lost languages using machine learning  |  Science Innovations: Scientists develop ‘mini-brains’ to help robots recognise pain & to self-repair  |  Health Monitor: Ayurvedic Postnatal Care  |  Parent Interventions: Online learning ergonomics: Keep your child engaged and strain-free  |  Parent Interventions: Cow’s milk protein intolerance risk factors   |  Parent Interventions: Safe sports for kids during Covid-19  |  Parent Interventions: E-modules increase provider knowledge related to adverse childhood experiences  |  Technology Inceptions: ICMR validates ‘COVIRAP' by IIT Kharagpur   |  National Edu News: India progressing rapidly towards the goal of indigenously made Supercomputers  |  Best Practices: “Aditi Urja Sanch” Unit at CSIR-NCL, Pune  |  Reflections: What Really Matters  |  Teacher Insights: New Harvard Online course course prepares professionals for a data-driven world  |  
July 11, 2019 Thursday 03:18:51 PM IST

Encoded learned behaviour

Teacher Insights

A team of Princeton scientists found that learned behaviours in C. elegans, a nematode, can be conveyed through the germline for multiple generations. (C. elegans is a primitive organism, that shares many of biological characteristics of human biology).Princeton University researchers have discovered that learned behaviours can be inherited for multiple generations in C. elegans, transmitted from parent to progeny via eggs and sperm cells.

It's well known that an organism's characteristics are encoded in genes that are passed down from parent to progeny through the eggs and sperm of the germline. The inheritance of some traits is determined exclusively by whether the individual receives the dominant or recessive form of an associated gene from each parent. Other heritable traits are influenced both by genetic makeup and by factors such as nutrition, temperature or environmental stress, which can affect the expression levels of related genes.

Researchers now found C. elegans can convey learned avoidance behaviour to their progeny. They found that when mother worms learned to avoid pathogenic P. aeruginosa, their progeny also knew to avoid the bacteria. When these modifications are made in germ cells, they can be passed down to future generations in a phenomenon known as transgenerational epigenetic inheritance.


Comments