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January 17, 2020 Friday 10:48:58 AM IST

Emotional Intelligence Helps Students Score Better

Teacher Insights

Students who understand and manage emotions better tend to get better grades in school, according to a research done by Carolyn MacCann of the University of Sydney.  The study published by American Psychological Association analysed data from more than 160 studies, representing more than 42,000 students from 27 countries. Regardless of age higher emotional intelligence (EI) helped children get better grades and achievement in test scores than those with lower EI. "Students with higher emotional intelligence may be better able to manage negative emotions, such as anxiety, boredom and disappointment, that can negatively affect academic performance," Carolyn MacCann said. "Also, these students may be better able to manage the social world around them, forming better relationships with teachers, peers and family, all of which are important to academic success." Earlier, it was believed that high intelligence and a conscientious personality were important psychological traits necessary for academic success.

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