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October 22, 2020 Thursday 12:55:44 PM IST

E-modules increase provider knowledge related to adverse childhood experiences

Parent Interventions

Training health care professionals in the skills and capacity to respond adequately to children and adults who have been exposed to trauma, such as adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), is recognized as an essential need in health care. But opportunities to educate physicians and physician-trainees in the science of childhood adversity and trauma-informed care are limited.  

The 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health revealed that almost 50% of youth in Washington D.C. had experienced an ACE. Motivated by this data, a research team led by Binny Chokshi, M.D., a pediatrician in the Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine at Children’s National Hospital, set out to create an accessible opportunity to train physicians in the science of childhood adversity, trauma-informed care, and resilience. The study’s researchers created four computer-based e-modules focused on addressing childhood adversity and implementing trauma-informed care in the pediatric primary care setting. The e-modules were designed for an individualized, self-directed experience to allow for distance learning with flexibility and provided an opportunity to train health professionals using an innovative, self-directed, and low-resource mechanism.  These e-modules were published Oct. 12 on MedEdPORTAL.

The e-modules were shown to be effective; findings showed that participants increased their knowledge, attitude, and confidence related to childhood adversity and trauma-informed care, after participating in the modules.



(Content Courtesy: https://childrensnational.org/news-and-events/childrens-newsroom/2020/emodules-increase-knowledge-and-confidence-related-to-childhood-adversity-and-trauma-informed-care)

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