Education Information: Cardiff achieves ‘Champion’ status for gender equality in physics  |  Parent Interventions: Online survey to assess needs of children and young people with cancer   |  Parent Interventions: Study links severe childhood deprivation to difficulties in adulthood  |  Parent Interventions: New study aims to learn the lessons of homeschooling  |  Teacher Insights: Using e-learning to raise biosecurity awareness  |  National Edu News: Science and Technology in finding solutions to combat COVID-19  |  National Edu News: Ek Bharat Shreshtha Bharat programme  |  Health Monitor: Beware of Hepatitis D, It can Lead to Hepatocellular Carcinoma  |  Teacher Insights: Education project to understand Birmingham learning at home during COVID-19  |  Education Information: UoG launches new onlines to meet some of the challenges of Covid-19  |  Teacher Insights: Professor Woolfson awarded Humboldt Research Prize  |  Parent Interventions: Parents paying heavy price for lockdown  |  Teacher Insights: Great Science Share brings science investigations into homes  |  Education Information: App will reduce high risk of falls during and after Lockdown  |  Education Information: University of Manchester to decarbonise its investment portfolio  |  
June 07, 2019 Friday 05:04:40 PM IST

Embryo stem cells from skin

Science Innovations

Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) have found a way to transform skin cells into the three major stem cell types that comprise early-stage embryos. The work (in mouse cells) has significant implications for modelling embryonic disease and placental dysfunctions, as well as paving the way to create whole embryos from skin cells.
Research  team discovered a set of genes capable of transforming murine skin cells into all three of the cell types that comprise the early embryo: the embryo itself, the placenta and the extra-embryonic tissues, such as the umbilical cord. 
The researchers analyzed changes to the genome function inside the cells when the five genes are introduced into the cell.  The skin cells initially lose their cellular identity and then slowly acquire a new identity of one of the three early embryonic cell types. This process is governed by the levels of two of the five genes-gene ‘Eomes’ and gene ‘Esrrb’. In the future, it may be possible to create entire human embryos out of human skin cells, without the need for sperm or eggs. The discovery could help solve certain infertility problems by creating human embryos in a ‘Petri dish’.

Comments