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August 19, 2019 Monday 12:55:10 PM IST

Egg shells help repair bones

Science Innovations

Eggshells can enhance the growth of new, strong bones needed in medical procedures, a team of University of Massachusetts Lowell researchers has discovered.

The technique developed could one day be applied to repair bones in patients with injuries due to aging, accidents, cancer and other diseases or in military combat. Through the innovative process, crushed eggshells( calcium carbonate) are inserted into a hydrogel mixture that forms a miniature frame to grow bone in the laboratory to be used for bone grafts. To do so, bone cells would be taken from the patient's body, introduced into this substance and then cultivated in an incubator before the resulting new bone is implanted into the patient. And, because the bone would be generated from cells taken from the patient, the possibility that the individual's immune system would reject the new material is greatly reduced.

Global waste of discarded eggshells typically amounts to millions of tonnes annually which can be put to clinical use.


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