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April 06, 2018 Friday 03:05:03 PM IST

Early Numeracy Performance Linked to Maths Activities at Home

Parent Interventions

New research links specific numerical activities carried out by parents to certain mathematical skills in young children. Published in Frontiers in Psychology, the study finds that the more parents tend to engage in mathematical activities with their children, the higher their early numeracy performance. 

Previous studies show that early mathematical skills provide a smoother transition to school mathematics. It’s well-established that parents can play a key role in their children’s early mathematical development although the link between “specific numerical activities and certain mathematical skills was not well understood”. 

To explore these links, researchers from Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in Belgium assessed 128 kindergarten-age children for various symbolic and non-symbolic numerical tasks. “We found that the more parents engaged in activities such as identifying numerals, sorting objects by size, colour, or shape, or learning simple sums, the higher the children performed on skills like counting,” says the study.


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