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August 01, 2017 Tuesday 12:22:49 PM IST

Early Emotional Training Reaps Lasting Benefits

Teacher Insights

A new research University of Illinois and Loyola University suggests that emotional learning programs for youth not only immediately improve mental health, social skills, and learning outcomes but also bring forth lasting benefits.

 

Training in social-emotional intelligence equips children to recognize and understand their emotions, feel empathy, make decisions and build and maintain relationships. Researchers suggest training in emotional intelligence during early adolescence.



“Especially during middle-school years and early adolescence, young people shift away from their families and toward influences in peer groups and teachers,” suggests the author. “Children spend 923 hours in the classroom every year; what happens in schools is very influential on child development.”

Comments
 
07/10/2017 09:16:12 IST
Dr. C.P. Unnikrishnan: I am from Kerala. A Life Science Teacher, retired in 2008, after 32 years of HSS teaching. All schools run 200 t0 210 days in one academic year. Subtracting all the formal 'Non Teaching Days', effectively a class runs about 180 days in a year. A class of 40 (avg) students runs a period for 40 minutes (avg) a day per subject. Assuming that a teacher must look at all students giving same duration to all, the time a teacher would get just to physically look at a student in one period is a maximum of 1 minute. ie. 180 minutes in 1 academic year. ie. 3.00 hrs in one academic year. The teacher must recall, provide new learning experience in the subject area, manage the class, and asses the days output. Practically, how would a teacher despite all sincerity, skill, competence and dedication objectively ensure the rest of the developmental aspect of each child? The home work and administratives tasks like planning lessons, writing records of work, test assessments etc. are extra inputs called for from a teacher.