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September 17, 2018 Monday 12:10:30 PM IST
Drumming helps children with autism

Drumming for just 60 minutes per week could reap rich benefits for children diagnoses with autism and supports their learning process, according to a recent research by University of Chichester. It improves the ability of students to follow their teacher’s instructions and to interact better in a social context with their peers and other members of the school staff. The results are published in the International Journal of Developmental Disabilities.

Researchers observed the following improvements in the autistic children due to this exercise:

  • A vast improvement in movement control while playing the drums, including dexterity, rhythm, timing.
  • Movement control was also enhanced while performing daily tasks outside the school environment, including an improved ability to concentrate during homework.
  • A range of positive changes in behavior within school environment, which were observed and reported by teachers, such as improved concentration and enhanced communication with peers and adults.

DOI: 10.1080/20473869.2018.1429041

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