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January 05, 2019 Saturday 10:51:23 AM IST

Discipline strategies to tackle misbehaviour

Parent Interventions

A spects such as a child’s genetic make-up, developmental level, learning history, present environment, physical state and emotional experience determine how a child behaves. Disciplining children is not easy; misbehaviour is a normal part of growing up and cannot be eliminated. Parents need to be consistent in their approach and build on their kids’ strengths, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

 Choose discipline strategies that encourage kids to do the hard work of behaviour change and fuel the internal motivation needed for accomplishment. This is effective discipline. By learning evidence-based techniques in behaviour modification, disciplining becomes more effective and manageable. Frequency and consistency form the key. Make expectations clear and responses to kids’ behaviour consistent.  Demonstrate over and again, the behaviour we desire, while creating clear boundaries and consequences when lines are crossed.

 Research has shown that physical and verbal punishment escalates undesired behaviour and increases the risk of poor social, emotional and behavioural consequences.


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