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April 12, 2018 Thursday 03:36:02 PM IST

Digital Dissection Tools can Enhance Science Lessons

Technology Inceptions

Cadaver dissection is the traditional way that medical students have learned about the human body's parts and functions. But the practice is expensive and study cadavers aren't easy to come by. The virtual dissection table has solved these problems for universities and now it's a way for high schools to provide aspiring doctors with as real an experience with the body and its workings as they can get.

Instead of learning with your typical miniature body model, the medical students now have the opportunity to dissect bodies, virtually.

The anatomy teaching tool allows students to see every muscle of the body. This also includes showing them abnormalities, such as an enlarged spleen. The 6-foot-long dissection table allows anatomy students to get a close look at every muscle in the human body on a touch-screen that functions much like an iPad. With a swipe of the fingers, students can peel away skin, muscle, and bones to reveal internal organs. Using their finger like a scalpel, students can "cut" anywhere on the body to examine a part's insides. A cut of the heart, for instance, reveals how blood flows through arteries and veins.

As far as operating on human cadavers is concerned, researchers at Michigan State University have found that digital dissection isn't quite as good as the real thing. 



(Source: blogs.edweek.org)

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