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August 01, 2017 Tuesday 12:22:49 PM IST

Diet to Keep Older Adults Agile

Parent Interventions

Eating right food is linked to a lower risk for memory difficulties in older adults, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The study recommends two types of diet to suit the purpose: the Mediterranean or the MIND diet.

 

The Mediterranean diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, potatoes, nuts, olive oil and fish. Processed foods, fried and fast foods, snack foods, red meat, poultry and whole-fat dairy foods are infrequently eaten on the Mediterranean diet.

 


The MIND diet is a version of the Mediterranean diet that includes 15 types of foods out of which 10 are considered “brain-healthy:” green leafy vegetables, other vegetables, nuts, berries, beans, whole grains, seafood, poultry, olive oil, and wine. The other five are considered unhealthy: red meat, butter and stick margarine, cheese, pastries, sweets and fried/fast foods.

 

This study suggests that eating Mediterranean and MIND-style diets is linked to better overall cognitive function in older adults.


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