Parent Interventions: Pallikkutam GlobalConnect#4 - Are You Eating the Right Food to Fight Covid-19?  |  Science Innovations: Three-Ply Masks Effective Against Covid-19: Texas Tech University  |  Science Innovations: Natural Rainbow Colours Produced  |  Technology Inceptions: Muscope, World’s Smallest Microscope  |  Science Innovations: Ultrasensitive Tactile Sensors for Robots  |  Policy Indications: How Materials Science Helps Contain Contain Covid-19 Spread  |  National Edu News: IIT Hyderabad and PharmCADD signed a pact for the co-development of new drugs   |  Teacher Insights: Be Game  |  Health Monitor: Understanding ‘Haemorrhage'  |  National Edu News: Pallikkutam GlobalConnect#3 on 'Innovative Tools for Effective Teaching'  |  Expert Counsel: The Nine Dash Line  |  National Edu News: Astronomers Find One Group of Appearing and Disappearing Stars  |  Teacher Insights: Bird Book for Children to Love Nature  |  International Edu News: New Model to Fight Social Media Deep Fakes  |  Teacher Insights: Universal Lunch Makes Students Healthier  |  
August 01, 2017 Tuesday 12:22:49 PM IST

Diet to Keep Older Adults Agile

Parent Interventions

Eating right food is linked to a lower risk for memory difficulties in older adults, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The study recommends two types of diet to suit the purpose: the Mediterranean or the MIND diet.

 

The Mediterranean diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, potatoes, nuts, olive oil and fish. Processed foods, fried and fast foods, snack foods, red meat, poultry and whole-fat dairy foods are infrequently eaten on the Mediterranean diet.

 


The MIND diet is a version of the Mediterranean diet that includes 15 types of foods out of which 10 are considered “brain-healthy:” green leafy vegetables, other vegetables, nuts, berries, beans, whole grains, seafood, poultry, olive oil, and wine. The other five are considered unhealthy: red meat, butter and stick margarine, cheese, pastries, sweets and fried/fast foods.

 

This study suggests that eating Mediterranean and MIND-style diets is linked to better overall cognitive function in older adults.


Comments