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July 22, 2019 Monday 04:58:54 PM IST

Diabetes Increases Risk of Heart Failure More in Women Than Men

by Steve Buissinne

A new study conducted by researchers at The George Institute for Global Health found that women with Type 1 diabetes and Type 2 diabetes were more likely at risk of heart failure compared to men.

Women with Type 1 diabetes are 47% more likely at risk of heart failure than men while women with type 2 diabetes are 9% more likely to face heart failure.  According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), currently 415 million adults world-wide live with diabetes – with approximately 199 million of them being women. The IDF expects by the year 2040 around 313 million women will be suffering from the disease. Diabetes is the ninth leading cause of death in women and claims 2.1 million female lives every year, more so than men. The number one leading cause of death for women is heart disease.
Key findings:
-Women with type 1 diabetes were associated with a more than 5-fold increased risk of heart failure compared with those without diabetes. For men, the risk was 3.5-fold higher.
-Corresponding increases in risks for heart failure associated with type 2 diabetes were 95% in women and 74% in men.-Researchers also found that both type 1 and type 2 diabetes were stronger risk factors for heart failure in women than men.-Type 1 diabetes was associated with a 47% greater excess risk of heart failure in women compared with men. 
-Type 2 diabetes was associated with a 9% greater excess risk of heart failure in women than men. 
This is based on data compiled from 10 countries: Australia, US, UK, Italy, Sweden, Canada, Japan, China, Taiwan and Korea.



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