Education Information: UCL announces plans to be open and ready to teach for September 2020  |  Technology Inceptions: Robot chef trained to make omelettes  |  International Edu News: Oxford Foundry backs four new COVID-19 recovery innovations  |  Leadership Instincts: Three Harvard graduates awarded Taliesin Prize  |  Science Innovations: IIT, BHU to re-purpose approved drugs from DrugBank database  |  Policy Indications: Consultation process for new STIP initiated  |  Policy Indications: NTPC accelerates Learning & Development Opportunities for 19000 Employees  |  National Edu News: Prime Minister announces "My Life My Yoga" Video Blogging contest  |  Science Innovations: IASST scientists develop herbal medicine loaded smart bandage for wounds  |  National Edu News: 4 COVID-19 Bio Banks established by the Department of Biotechnology  |  Science Innovations: A Rapid Response Regulatory enabling mechanism against Covid-19  |  National Edu News: Scaling up of COVID testing centres in laboratories and Universities   |  Leadership Instincts: DST initiates COVID-19 India National Supermodel  |  Policy Indications: Responsible AI for Youth Programme  |  National Edu News: IT Minister Launches National AI Portal of India- www.ai.gov.in  |  
August 24, 2017 Thursday 02:00:03 PM IST

Detailed images of distant star caught

Science Innovations

Berlin: Astronomers have captured the first detailed images of the surface and atmosphere of a star outside the solar system, a report said.

Images of Antares, a red supergiant, more than 500 light-years from Earth in the constellation Scorpio, have been captured, reported Nature magazine. 

The team obtained the images using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope, a complex of four telescopes perched on a mountain in the Paranal desert of Chile, Efe news said.

The star makes an interesting object for study because it is rapidly losing mass in the course of an outward expansion that will lead eventually to a supernova.


"How stars like Antares lose mass so quickly in the final phase of their evolution has been a problem for over half a century," the paper's lead author, Keiichi Ohnaka of Chile's Universidad Catolica del Norte, said.

The images allowed the team to detect unexpected turbulence in the outer atmosphere of Antares -- activity that could not be explained by any known processes. "The next challenge is to identify what's driving the turbulent motions," Ohnaka said.

Comments