Reflections: What Really Matters  |  Teacher Insights: New Harvard Online course course prepares professionals for a data-driven world  |  Parent Interventions: Research shows lullabies in any language relax babies  |  International Edu News: 'Plastic bags could be 'eco-friendlier' than paper and cotton bags'  |  Leadership Instincts: Start-up with plastic waste recycling solution wins top prize at ideasinc 2020  |  International Edu News: Frailty, old age and comorbidity main predictors of death from Covid-19  |  Leadership Instincts: Cyber centre to reduce digital harm  |  Policy Indications: New funding to improve water security for 10 million people in Africa and Asia  |  International Edu News: UCL hosts global conference on UN Sustainable Development Goals  |  International Edu News: Medium-term impact of COVID-19 revealed in new study  |  International Edu News: Extremely rapid diagnostic test for Covid-19  |  Teacher Insights: Cambridge University Press to join with Cambridge Assessment  |  National Edu News: Minister inaugurates new Diamond Jubilee Lecture Hall Complex of NIT Jamshedpur  |  Education Information: CSIR partnered clinical trials website “CUReD” on Repurposed Drugs for Covid- 19  |  Teacher Insights: The 6th India International Science Festival to be held in Virtual format  |  
September 27, 2018 Thursday 10:34:38 AM IST

Denmark installs pavement that recycles water

Technology Inceptions

The 50-metre-long pilot stretch contains “Climate Tiles” with holes that channel water to surrounding plants, with excess water stored until it evaporates.

Tiles can also be used on roofs, where water is transferred to water tanks.

With more rain expected in Denmark as the climate changes, the idea is to cut the amount of water going into sewers, reducing time and money spent needing to repair and expand wastewater facilities.

The Climate Tile, devised in 2014, is constructed with vertical and horizontal pipes, and can be updated and maintained over its 50 year life span.Its creator, Danish firm Third Nature, says the tiles can redirect 30% of the projected increase in rainwater that will be created by climate change.


Flemming Rafn Thomsen, Third Nature partner, said: “We are happy to be able to now demonstrate a scalable climate adaptation system. Beyond working 1% of the time when we have climate accelerated rain incidents, the solution furthermore creates value for the city the remaining 99%. “We believe our streets are the bloodstreams of society and that the sidewalk is an underappreciated part of our infrastructure that holds great potential for future communities in our ever-growing cities

Comments