Parent Interventions: Navigating through the Pandemic  |  Health Monitor: Attention and Memory Deficits in People Who Experienced Mild Covid  |  Parent Interventions: How can we Revert Peanut Allergies in Children?  |  Teacher Insights: Play Based Learning has a Positive Impact on Child's Learning and Development  |  Health Monitor: Social Media Use Likely to Affect the Physical Health of a Person  |  Parent Interventions: How to Deal with Developmental Language Disorder in Children  |  Health Monitor: Lifestyle Interventions from Early Childhood Prevents Cardiovascular Diseases  |  Teacher Insights: Teacher Expectations Can Have Powerful Impact on Students Academic Achievement  |  Policy Indications: Make Sure the Digital Technology Works for Public Good  |  Teacher Insights: The Significance of Social Emotional Learning Curriculum in Schools  |  Health Monitor: Forgetting is a Form of Learning  |  Higher Studies: University of Manchester Invites Application for LLB and LLM Programmes   |  Health Monitor: Is There a Blue Spot Inside our Brain?  |  Parent Interventions: Babies born during the Pandemic Performs Lower during Developmental Screening  |  Policy Indications: Invest in Structural Steel R&D : Prof BS Murty  |  
February 07, 2019 Thursday 03:15:37 PM IST

Culture reduces depression

Teacher Insights

Researchers at University College London found a clear link between the frequency of 'cultural engagement' and the chances of someone over 50 developing depression. The study undertaken by them shows that cultural activities not only help people manage and recover from depression but can actually help to prevent it. It found that regular visits to the cinema, theatre or to museums could dramatically reduce the chances of becoming depressed in older age.

The study looked at data on more than 2,000 people over the age of 50, covering health, social, wellbeing and economic circumstances of older people in England.The power of the cultural activities lies in the combination of social interaction, creativity, mental stimulation and gentle physical activity they encourage. If one starts to feel low or isolated, then cultural engagement is something simple that the person can do to proactively help to improve mental health, according to the study.

Comments