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February 07, 2019 Thursday 03:15:37 PM IST

Culture reduces depression

Teacher Insights

Researchers at University College London found a clear link between the frequency of 'cultural engagement' and the chances of someone over 50 developing depression. The study undertaken by them shows that cultural activities not only help people manage and recover from depression but can actually help to prevent it. It found that regular visits to the cinema, theatre or to museums could dramatically reduce the chances of becoming depressed in older age.

The study looked at data on more than 2,000 people over the age of 50, covering health, social, wellbeing and economic circumstances of older people in England.The power of the cultural activities lies in the combination of social interaction, creativity, mental stimulation and gentle physical activity they encourage. If one starts to feel low or isolated, then cultural engagement is something simple that the person can do to proactively help to improve mental health, according to the study.

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