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November 20, 2017 Monday 12:19:29 PM IST

Coping with children's high school stress

Parent Interventions

Entering high school can be an exciting experience for a teen but can also be scary and confusing. One study shows that a number of high school students feel stress on a daily basis.

Chris Palmer is a father, speaker, author, and wildlife film producer, who gives speeches and workshops on a variety of topics, including how to parent effectively, and how to motivate and engage students. He has some suggestions on how parents of teens can help.

"Be there" for your children. This does not mean being overprotective and trying to solve all their problems. Listen, without making judgements or rushing to offer solutions. Let them talk about their problems, and find their own solutions if they can.

Listen to teens intently and give them emotional security. Expect your teen to be occasionally grumpy and moody, and try not to take it personally.


Be supportive. Stress your unconditional love, and show that you admire and respect his effort to tackle the challenges of starting high school.

Attend to the basics. Do whatever you can to help them get enough sleepeat healthily and exercise regularly. All of those things will help them to manage their stress.

Find out – or have your teen find out – about extracurricular activities at the high school. Joining a club, sport or activity can be a great way to build a community of friends quickly and adjust to new surroundings.

Remember that stress can also be good.


All stress is not bad. Stress arising from challenging situations that they can successfully handle is healthy and even desirable.

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