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March 27, 2019 Wednesday 09:13:30 AM IST

Congenital Heart Defects Higher in Offspring if Father Smokes

Parent Interventions

A new research report in European Society of Cardiology (ESC) pointed out that the risk of a baby born with congenital heart defects is higher if the father is a smoker.

The report published in European Journal of Preventive Cardiology stated that congenital heart defects contribute to eight still born births out of 1000 babies born world-wide. A father-to-be who smokes also makes the mother-to-be a passive smoker and increases the health risks of the new born. Passive smoking of women is seen to be more harmful than direct smoking by women during pregnancy. The study is based on analysis of 137,574 congenital heart disease cases.

The report concludes that paternal smoking, maternal active smoking and maternal passive smoking has to be prevented to ensure a healthy offspring without congenital heart disease.


Source: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2047487319831367

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