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January 06, 2021 Wednesday 11:49:33 AM IST

Computer Simulation to Treat ADHD

Parent Interventions

The use of computer simulation to identify symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children provides an objective tool to gauge the presence and severity of behavioural problems, according to scientists at Ohio State University. Most mental health disorders are diagnosed and treated based on clinical interviews and questionnaires -- and, for about a century, data from cognitive tests have been added to the diagnostic process to help clinicians learn more about how and why people behave in a certain way. But such tests don’t capture the complexity of the symptoms. It is widely recognized that children with ADHD take longer to make decisions while performing tasks than children who don’t have the disorder, and tests have relied on average response times to explain the difference. But there are intricacies to that dysfunction that a computational model could help pinpoint, providing information clinicians, parents and teachers could use to make life easier for kids with ADHD.

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