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April 17, 2018 Tuesday 12:48:35 PM IST

Computer of a Pinhead Size!

Science Innovations

New Hampshire: Researchers have discovered that using an easily made combination of materials might be the way to offer a more stable environment for smaller and safer data storage, ultimately leading to miniature computers

If the experiment successes, there is every possibility that the world will be seeing a computer having the size of a pinhead, which can be used as small data stotage and tinier computers.

The research has been carried out by the University of New Hampshire. In their study, recently published in the journal Science Advances, the researchers outline their proposed combination which would allow for a more stable perpendicular anisotropic energy (PMA), the key driving component in a computer’s RAM (random-access memory) or data storage. 

The material would be made up of ultrathin films, known as Fe monolayers, grown on top of non-magnetic substances, in this case X nitride substrate, where X could be boron, gallium, aluminum or indium. According to the research, this combination showed anisotropic energy would increase by fifty times, from 1 meV to 50 meV, allowing for larger amounts of data to be stored in smaller environments. There is a provisional patent pending which has been filed by UNHInnovation, which advocates for, manages, and promotes UNH’s intellectual property.


(Source: www.unh.edu)

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