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November 19, 2019 Tuesday 10:04:27 AM IST

Community care system benefits youth

Parent Interventions

Students in Pennsylvania school districts that participated in Communities that Care (CTC) coalition were significantly less likely to use alcohol or marijuana, or to engage in delinquent behaviour than those in non-CTC districts, according to a recent study published in Prevention Science.

Based upon self-reports, students in the CTC school districts that used at least one evidence-based programme were less likely to engage in marijuana use by 22%, cigarette use by 17% and alcohol consumption by 15%.
More than 500 communities throughout the US use the CTC model, which involves a five-phase change process with the goal of promoting healthy youth development and reducing problem behaviours. Coalitions comprised of community stakeholders who receive training in prevention science methods and data-based decision making.

The study, funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, is the largest to-date to examine the effectiveness of Pennsylvania CTC coalitions.


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