Teacher Insights: Free research-backed games to train your brain  |  Teacher Insights: How your co-workers can influence your skills   |  Teacher Insights: Golden Apple Awards for Excellence in Teaching 2020  |  Teacher Insights: Academic Success Linked to Genes, Family Income  |  International Edu News: UNESCO celebrates International Day of Education   |  Education Information: First Tech MBA in Europe by IE Business School  |  International Edu News: Nominations invited for UNESCO/Guillermo Cano World Press Freedom Prize 2020   |  Education Information: IIT Roorkee invites applications for MBA Programme 2020  |  National Edu News: IIM Indore and TikToK to collaborate on Digital India Mission   |  Education Information: BCU partners with Ronkel Media Education Institute  |  Education Information: Ten lucky IELTS takers to get prize from British Council   |  Education Information: British Council invites applications for Future News Worldwide 2020  |  Technology Inceptions: New eye movement test to confirm brain-ageing effects  |  Health Monitor: Lack of nutrition in packed lunches for children   |  Leadership Instincts: Start Up 2020 offers insights for aspiring entrepreneurs  |  
August 01, 2017 Tuesday 12:22:49 PM IST

Cause of Depression Identified

Science Innovations

In a major scanning study, researchers have identified changes in the brain’s structure that could be the result of depression. Alterations were found in parts of white matter. It contains fibre tracts that enable brain cells to communicate with one another by electrical signals. The results are published in Scientific Reports.

 Scientists at the University of Edinburgh used a cutting-edge technique known as diffusion tensor imaging to map the structure of white matter. Integrity of the white matter was found less in people who reported symptoms of depression. However, the same changes were not seen in people who were unaffected.


“There is an urgent need to provide treatment for depression and an improved understanding of it mechanisms will give us a better chance of developing new and more effective methods of treatment,” said Heather Whalley of Edinburgh.


Comments