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July 11, 2019 Thursday 03:44:56 PM IST

Cartoons with Narrative Structure Understood Better By Children

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A study conducted among primary school children in the  8-9 year age group and 11-12 age group found that cartoons with narrative structure were easily processed and their values understood easily by children compared to non-narrative cartoons.
The study was done by University of The Basque Country using Doraemon, with a narrative structure and Code Lyoko with a non-narrative structure. Those who viewed the narrative structure perceived the values effortlessly. The non-narrative ones were short, altered and focus was almost exclusively on the sequences of action.
Those watching the non-narrative structure had to continuously maintain eye contact with the screen. So this study has given rise to some didactic proposals targeting schoolchildren, family members and professionals in the sphere of psycho-education and communication, and which are designed to encourage the development of children's narrative skills and education in values and counter-values through their favourite fictional content. 
The researcher has said that cartoons may be used both at school and at home to train children on values and counter-values. It can be also be effectively used to develop narrative skills as long as suitable resources are used and are adapted on the basis of age.  
Source: https://revistas.um.es/analesps/article/view/331441



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