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August 30, 2018 Thursday 04:14:02 PM IST

Can sound be weighed?

Science Innovations

You might have seen ships floating over water. Can you imagine a steel ball floating? Yes, if it is having a property called antigravity; they will float even if they are massive.

You surely enjoy the waves of great music of A. R. Rahman reaching your ears. Do you believe the sound contains particles as well as waves? The particle of sound is called phonon, as we call the particle of light as photon.

The researchersfrom Columbia Universityhas shown that phonons, like material particles, have mass! And more specifically, negative mass!! When acted upon by gravity, they move in the opposite direction, as done by material particles. This means “steel balls float” in a fluid.

The researchers assume that sound waves will bend away from massive neutron stars, if their predictions are correct. This also could mean that sound plays a role in the behaviour of stars in the sky!


Source: https://www.livescience.com/63305-sound-waves-negative-gravity-mass.html

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