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July 10, 2019 Wednesday 10:05:31 AM IST

Buying of Fruits and Vegetables Higher Among New Parents

Food by Free-Photos of Pixabay.cpm

A new study by University of Michigan has shown that new parents tend to spend more on fruits and vegetables.
The study published in Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior showed that in the case of new parents’ expenditure on fruits as a proportion of grocery budget rose by 21% and vegetables 10% when compared to their pre-parent stage. This increase was noticed in middle and higher income families who earn 185% above the poverty level ($39,000 or above).
Those from lower income groups did not alter their purchasing patterns on becoming new parents. The study was based on data collected from 2007-15 from 21,939 households in the age group of 25-49. Among 508 households that had new parents, it was found that their spending on fruits and vegetables had risen to 12% from 10%.
The study doesn't look at the actual consumption of fruits and vegetables nevertheless it points to the importance of adopting a healthy diet when a woman becomes pregnant and continue to observe it in their lives for better health and longevity. The study also underscores the importance of investing in programs and policies that help low-income households buy more fruits and vegetables.

Source: https://news.umich.edu/study-new-parents-spend-more-on-fruits-and-vegetables/



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