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May 20, 2020 Wednesday 08:41:52 PM IST

Bristol’s photon discovery, a major step toward large-scale quantum technologies

Leadership Instincts

A team of physicists at the University of Bristol has developed the first integrated photon source with the potential to deliver large-scale quantum photonics.The development of quantum technologies promises to have a profound impact across science, engineering and society. Quantum computers at scale will be able to solve problems intractable on even the most powerful current supercomputers, with many revolutionary applications, for example, in the design of new drugs and materials. 

Integrated quantum photonics is a promising platform for developing quantum technologies due to its capacity to generate and control photons – single particles of light – in miniaturized complex optical circuits. Leveraging the mature CMOS Silicon industry for the fabrication of integrated devices enables circuits with the equivalent of thousands of optical fibres and components to be integrated on a single millimetre-scale chip.  The use of integrated photonics for developing scalable quantum technologies is in high demand. The University of Bristol is a pioneer in this field, as demonstrated by new research published in Nature Communications. 




(Content and Image Courtesy: https://www.bristol.ac.uk/news/2020/may/quantum-leap.html)

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