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July 08, 2019 Monday 01:07:23 PM IST

Breast Cancer Drug Tamoxifen Seen Effective Against E.coli

bacteria by Arek Socha for Pixabay.com

Tamoxifen, a drug approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was seen to be helpful in fighting Shiga-toxin producing E.coli that can cause damage to kidneys. 
Anti-biotics are not effective against E.coli as it increases the release of Shiga toxins. Somsuhvra Mukhopadhyay, an assistant professor of pharmacology and toxicology, had conducted a study on how Shiga toxins enter human cells and cause cell death. This led to discovery of an existing drug that can be effective against E.coli.
The results of the find were reported in Life Science Alliance.“The ability to repurpose an old drug to treat Shiga toxicosis is exciting because it may be possible to advance this mode of therapy into clinical practice more rapidly than a new compound,” Mukhopadhyay said.
We hope to license Dr. Mukhopadhyay’s discovery and make it available to the public. In the past year alone, the United States has experienced three major outbreaks of food-borne Shiga toxin-producing E. coli spanning 40 states,” said Kristin Falkenstein, a licensing specialist in UT Austin’s Office of Technology Commercialization. “It offers a promising therapeutic solution using an FDA-approved drug in the face of an increasingly prevalent epidemic.” 
Large number of people die in USA due to lethal food borne disease caused by E.coli every  year. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 265,000 people in the United States are affected by STEC each year, resulting in approximately 3,600 hospitalizations and 30 deaths.



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