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September 06, 2017 Wednesday 10:01:23 AM IST

Brands Have Little Bearing on Children’s Food Choices

Parent Interventions

Do brands have a role in children’s food preferences? A recent study in the journal Appetite says kids who have their own money to spend are least motivated by brands. The inclination is more towards snacks of their liking, more often bordering on the unhealthy. Other kids who had plenty of money at their disposal were careful while buying brands which charged  more, but sold unhealthy stuff. Such choices indirectly helped them to buy healthy stuff, said the study. Parental guidance, schools and food manufacturers influence children. Awareness of nutrient-poor snacks hold back kids from buying such products. But the study has not been able to conclusively say what exactly influences a child to spend his own money on a particular snack food.

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