Policy Indications: Madhya Pradesh Launches Startup Programme 2022  |  Cover Story: Elimination Round or Aptitude Test- How to Align CUET with NEP 2020 Goals  |  Art & Literature: Song of the Rain- Monsoon in Literature, Journalism and Films  |  Life Inspirations: Master of a Dog House  |  Education Information: Climate Predictions: Is it all a Piffle!  |  Best Practices: Project Manzil Inspires Young Girls to Seek Aspiring Careers  |  Leadership Instincts: Raj Mashruwala Establishes CfHE Vagbhata Chair in Medical Devices at IITH   |  Parent Interventions: 10 Tricks to Help You Prepare for This Year's IB Chemistry Test  |  National Edu News: TiHAN supports a Chair for Prof Srikanth Saripalli at IIT Hyderabad  |  Teacher Insights: How To Build Competitive Mindset in Children Without Stressing Them  |  Parent Interventions: What Books Children Must Read this Summer Vacation   |  Policy Indications: CUET Mandatory for Central Universities  |  Teacher Insights: Classroom Dialogue for a Better World  |  Rajagiri Round Table: Is Time Ripe for Entrepreneurial Universities in India?  |  Life Inspirations: How to Overcome Fear of Public Speaking  |  
June 12, 2019 Wednesday 01:43:31 PM IST

Brain wiring behind conduct disorder

Teacher Insights

Behavioural problems in young people with severe anti-social behaviour -- known as conduct disorder -- could be caused by differences in the brain's wiring that link the brain's emotional centres together, according to new research led by the University of Birmingham.

Conduct disorder affects around 1 in 20 children and teenagers and is characterised by a wide range of anti-social or aggressive behaviours such as vandalism, weapon use and harm to others. It is often also associated with other disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety, or depression. scientists in the University's Centre for Human Brain Health and the Institute for Mental Health have found that there are distinctive differences in white matter pathways (the brain's structural wiring) among young people who have the condition.The researchers found that the differences in the ‘corpus callosum’ were linked to callous behaviour, including deficits in empathy and a disregard for other people's feelings.


Comments