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June 20, 2019 Thursday 02:30:57 PM IST

Brain Considers Information The Same Way as Money or Food

Science Innovations

A new research report has shown that our brain considers information in the same way as it treats money or food.

Information whether useful or not is its own reward and that makes us to keep looking for new information on our mobile or personal computer, according to Ming Hsu, a neuroeconomist at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business. To understand the science behind curiosity, the researchers scanned the brains of people who were involved in a gambling game. They were provided with a series of lotteries. They had to decide how much they were willing to pay to know their odds of winning. People tend to overvalue information in general, especially the higher-valued lotteries.


The researchers concluded that there are  economic and psychological motivation in seeking information. They acquired it not only for actual benefit but also on anticipation of a benefit irrespective of whether it was useful or not. How
Source: https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2019/06/10/1820145116



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