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July 11, 2018 Wednesday 10:10:41 AM IST

Brain and Stomach, and Nightshifts

Science Innovations

People’s work pattern has extremely high impact on hormones and particularly, night shifts initiate dramatic consequences on the balance between brain and digestive system.    

Working night shifts can impair the body’s natural rhythms so much that the brain and digestive system end up completely out of fitness with one another and to irreparable conditions, scientists say.   

Human body has different clocks that regulate and supervise the natural rhythms of organs and systems throughout it. Research has found out that while the body’s clock in brain is little impacted by three night shifts in a row, it played havoc with gut function, throwing the natural cycle out by a full 12 hours.                                             

It was found that the night shifts also disrupted the rhythms of two metabolites linked to chronic kidney disease.


This study of simulated day vs night-shift work yields insight into the link between prolonged exposure to shift work and the spectrum of associated metabolic disorders.  

For more details: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2018/07/09/1801183115


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