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March 15, 2018 Thursday 11:26:20 AM IST

Boomerang Offspring Damages Parents' Harmony

Parent Interventions

Research suggests that children, once grown up and moved out from parents' home for studies, job or a changed marital status, tend to come back after a while to the nest. This boomerang offspring is found to have breaking the harmony of the parents who are all set with a relaxed routine for retired life.

A study by the London School of Economics (LSE) shows that after decades of growing independence among young adults and a dramatic decline in intergenerational co-residence, the trend is now shifting in the other direction.

Major reason for this boomerang phenomena is said to be the rising housing cost. Job insecurity and lack of confidence also contribute to it. The LSE research, which is based on analysis of longitudinal data from the over-50s in 17 European countries between 2007-2015, is the first to look at the impact of the growing boomerang phenomenon. While the report acknowledges that co-resident adult children can be a source of emotional and practical support for older parents, it says they are also a source of conflict and stress in the family home.

The report is published in the latest edition of the journal Social Science & Medicine and was based on data from France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Luxembourg, Belgium, the Netherlands, Sweden, Denmark, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Greece, Slovenia, the Czech Republic, Estonia and Poland.


(Source: The Guardian)

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