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November 29, 2019 Friday 10:59:16 AM IST

Better sleep habits to improve college grades

Parent Interventions

Two professors of Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found a strong relationship between students' grades and how much sleep they are getting. What time students go to bed and the consistency of their sleep habits also make a big difference. Getting a good night's sleep just before a big test is not good enough - it takes several nights in a row of good sleep to make a difference.

Those are among the conclusions from an experiment in which 100 students in an MIT engineering class were given Fitbits, the popular wrist-worn devices that track a person's activity 24/7. The findings are reported in the journal Science of Learning.

Those who got relatively consistent amounts of sleep each night did better than those who had greater variations from one night to the next, even if they ended up with the same average amount, the study said. 


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