Technology Inceptions: HP ProBook 445 G6 Business Laptop launched  |  Rajagiri Round Table: 51st Rajagiri Round Table:Listening Skills Should Become Part of Curriculum  |  National Edu News: India Launches NISHTHA, the largest Teachers' Training Programme in the World  |  Technology Inceptions: Black Shark to launch new phones  |  Science Innovations: Designer algae to produce fuels   |  Parent Interventions: For a stronger father-child relationship  |  Parent Interventions: Vitamin D Deficiency in Middle Childhood Can Cause Aggressive Behavior  |  Technology Inceptions: Flipkart revamps seller onboarding process  |  Technology Inceptions: New range of Nokia Mesh Wi-Fi Router  |  Teacher Insights: Vacation to reduce cardiovascular diseases  |  Science Innovations: Chemo drug with fewer side effects  |  National Edu News: Kala Utsav 2019 Guidelines Released by MHRD  |  Education Information: Chandrayaan-2 Precisely Inserted in Defined Orbit  |  Health Monitor: Fascination for Slimness Has Racial Origins, Not Linked to Health  |  Parent Interventions: Online Brain Games Help in Multi-Tasking at Old Age   |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

February 11, 2019 Monday 04:25:49 PM IST

Ask your girl child to do science, not become scientist

Teacher Insights

Girls perform better when they are asked to "do science" rather than putting thoughts on them to become a scientist, according to a new research by Marjorie Rhodes, an associate professor of Department of Psychology at New York University.

It is a fact that women are under-represented in science and differences in science achievements between boys and girls begin from childhood itself, according to Rhodes and co-author of the study Sarah-Jane Leslie of Princeton's University. Girls should be guided to action in science rather than putting before them an identity of a scientist  to be acquired later in life. The conclusion is based on research studies conducted among children in the 4-9 age group who played a game of science. The girls who were told in the beginning to ‘do science’ were more persistent than those who were told to ‘be scientists.’ The study conducted among boys were more variable as older boys tend to take science if the language used to encourage them was 'identity oriented'.

The research results may help in using appropriate strategies for boys and girls in schools to encourage them to positively think about doing an activity. This could help them in the choice of careers based on their interest and aptitude.


Source: https://www.psychologicalscience.org/news/releases/doing-science-increases-girls-engagement.html

Comments