Parent Interventions: Navigating through the Pandemic  |  Health Monitor: Attention and Memory Deficits in People Who Experienced Mild Covid  |  Parent Interventions: How can we Revert Peanut Allergies in Children?  |  Teacher Insights: Play Based Learning has a Positive Impact on Child's Learning and Development  |  Health Monitor: Social Media Use Likely to Affect the Physical Health of a Person  |  Parent Interventions: How to Deal with Developmental Language Disorder in Children  |  Health Monitor: Lifestyle Interventions from Early Childhood Prevents Cardiovascular Diseases  |  Teacher Insights: Teacher Expectations Can Have Powerful Impact on Students Academic Achievement  |  Policy Indications: Make Sure the Digital Technology Works for Public Good  |  Teacher Insights: The Significance of Social Emotional Learning Curriculum in Schools  |  Health Monitor: Forgetting is a Form of Learning  |  Higher Studies: University of Manchester Invites Application for LLB and LLM Programmes   |  Health Monitor: Is There a Blue Spot Inside our Brain?  |  Parent Interventions: Babies born during the Pandemic Performs Lower during Developmental Screening  |  Policy Indications: Invest in Structural Steel R&D : Prof BS Murty  |  
July 24, 2019 Wednesday 08:32:44 AM IST

Artificial Intelligence: Neural Network Models With Self-Awareness Developed

Dr KongFatt Wong-Lin and Nadim Atiya of Ulster University Intelligence Systems Research Centre

Uncertainty in making decisions have an impact on decision-making as it causes change-of-mind while processing data or information. Now researchers at University of Ulster have developed world's first biologically motivated, computational model that can quantify this decision uncertainty. 
The latest and advanced artificial intelligence (AI) used in industry although encompassing machine learning techniques and powerful computational resources still lack an essential component of human intelligence-self awareness. 
The Ulster University researchers have gone beyond existing AI technologies and showed tht neural network models can be equipped with metacognition or self-awareness of their own actions and choices.The computer model can not only mimic brain activity observed in humans and some animals, but also replicate change-of-mind and error correction behaviour, which require "on-the-fly" metacognitive processing. 
The senior author and researcher of the research work, Dr KongFatt Wong-Lin, commented:

“Our research has revealed the plausible brain circuit mechanisms underlying how we calculate decision uncertainty, which could in turn influence or bias our actions, such as change-of-mind. Further, given the wide applications of artificial neural networks in A.I., we are perhaps closer than ever before to creating self-aware machines than we have previously thought. Real-time monitoring of decision confidence in artificial neural networks could also potentially allow better interpretability of the decisions and actions made by these algorithms, thereby leading to more responsible and trustworthy A.I.” 
Mr. Nadim Atiya, lead author of the paper and a PhD researcher at the ISRC, added: 
“Our research work could also form the basis towards understanding brain disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and addiction, in which metacognitive abilities are impaired, linking Computational Neuroscience to Psychiatry; a nascent research area named Computational Psychiatry.” 
Dr. Wong-Lin further outlined ongoing work: 
“We are now working with cognitive scientists and brain scientists to further develop our computer model, while creating conscious machines that are self-aware of their actions and decisions consequently making A.I. and machines much more intelligent and interpretable.”


More Details : https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-10316-8

 



Comments