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March 15, 2018 Thursday 11:57:57 AM IST

Artificial Intelligence can be used to Trace Illegal Wildlife Trafficking

Technology Inceptions

As one part of the globe is fighting hard to preserve the biodiversity, shocking news is coming from the other part that the social media has been widely used to trade wildlife illegally!

In a new article published in the journal 'Conservation Biology', scientists from the University of Helsinki, Digital Geography Lab, argue that methods from artificial intelligence can be used to help monitor the illegal wildlife trade on social media.

As there are no sufficient tools to monitor or block such activity, researchers are trying hard to use artificial intelligence to trace the same. 

Most of the social media platforms provide an application programming interface that allows researchers to access user-generated text, images and videos, as well as the accompanying metadata, such as where and when the content was uploaded, and connections between the users. Research are going on the basis that machine learning methods can provide an efficient means of monitoring illegal wildlife trade on social media.


Scientists are of opinion that the machine learning algorithms can be trained to detect which species  appear in an image or video in a social media post. It can then classify the setting, such as a natural habitat or a marketing place. They also stress the importance of collaborating with law enforcement agencies and social media companies to further improve the outcomes of their work and help stop illegal wildlife trade on social media.


(Source: Eurekalert.org)



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