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March 04, 2020 Wednesday 12:11:31 PM IST

Anti-social behaviour and brain structure

Science Innovations

People who engage in anti-social behaviour long after adolescence have characteristic differences in brain structure, according to a UCL-led study. The scientists were able to spot brain differences between people who engage in antisocial behaviour-such as theft, aggression, violence, bullying, lying or repeated failure to take care of work or school responsibilities- only during adolescence and those who persist throughout adulthood. “Our findings support the idea that, for the small proportion of individuals with life-course-persistent antisocial behaviour, there may be differences in their brain structure that make it difficult for them to develop social skills that prevent them from engaging in antisocial behaviour. These people could benefit from more support throughout their lives,” said lead author Dr Christina Carlisi (UCL Psychology & Language Sciences).


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