Best Practices: Enriching Learning at School, A Dubai School Sets an Example  |  Career News: Huge Opportunities for Public Policy Professionals in Corporate Sector  |  International Edu News: USCIS Implements eProcessing for Citizenship and Immigration Services  |  International Edu News: Harvard, MIT, Stanford, Oxford Tops World University Rankings  |  Career News: ICSI to Setup More Study Centres In India  |  Career News: Chartered Accountants: ICAI Placement Programme Helps 3180 Candidates Get Jobs  |  Parent Interventions: Trust in Government Schools Lower in Rural and Urban Households: IIMA Survey  |  Higher Studies: Where to Get Authentic Information on Medicine Courses Offered Abroad?  |  Best Practices: IP Nani, The Tech-Savvy Grandma-Son Helps Govt Tackle IP Crimes  |  Technology Inceptions: IP Nani, The Tech-Savvy Grandma-Son Helps Govt Tackle IP Crimes  |  Best Practices: CISCE Encourages Schools to Create Awareness About IPRs  |  Teacher Insights: CISCE Encourages Schools to Create Awareness About IPRs  |  Education Information: HSCAP Kerala Plus One allotment list released   |  National Edu News: Scholarships for women to pursue master’s programs in engineering at IISC  |  National Edu News: Indo-U.S. Fellowship for Women in STEMM (WISTEMM)  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

April 20, 2019 Saturday 04:04:41 PM IST
Alarming Rise in Kids Swallowing Foreign Objects

There is an alarming rise in kids swallowing foreign objects while playing with toys according to a new US research study.

The study done by the Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio for a 21-year study from 1995-2015 showed that rate of foreign body injestions had increased from 9.5 to 18 per 10,000 children. Among the foreign bodies swallowed by children accidentally include batteries, small toys, coins, jewellery and other objects that can cause injury or harm to the child. The study noted that children in the age group of one to three were more vulnerable to swallowing of foreign objects. Objects such as button cells can cause chemical burns if it remans stuck in the oesophagus for more than two hours.


The report underscores the importance of safety precautions to be followed by toy manufacturers and parents who give toys to children to keep them engaged. They must also ensure that coins, button cells and plastic objects that can choke a child should be kept out of their reach.

Source: https://tinyurl.com/y6lqfvqk


 



Comments