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February 24, 2020 Monday 03:51:56 PM IST

AI helps predict heart attacks and stroke

Technology Inceptions

In a study led by UCL and Barts Health NHS Trust, artificial intelligence has been used for the first time to instantly and accurately measure blood flow. The results were found to be able to predict chances of death, heart attack and stroke, and can be used by doctors to help recommend treatments which could improve a patient’s blood flow. Heart disease is the leading global cause of death and illness. Reduced blood flow, which is often treatable, is a common symptom of many heart conditions. International guidelines therefore recommend a number of assessments to measure a patient’s blood flow, but many are invasive and carry a risk. 

Non-invasive blood flow assessments are available, including Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) imaging, but up until now, the scan images have been incredibly difficult to analyse in a manner precise enough to deliver a prognosis or recommend treatment.

In the largest study of its kind, funded by British Heart Foundation and published in the journal Circulation, researchers took routine CMR scans from more than 1,000 patients attending St Bartholomew's Hospital and the Royal Free Hospital and used a new automated artificial intelligence technique to analyse the images. By doing this, the teams were able to precisely and instantaneously quantify the blood flow to the heart muscle and deliver the measurements to the medical teams treating the patients.

By comparing the AI-generated blood flow results with the health outcomes of each patient, the team found that the patients with reduced blood flow were more likely to have adverse health outcomes including death, heart attack, stroke and heart failure.


The AI technique was therefore shown for the first time to be able to predict which patients might die or suffer major adverse events, better than a doctor could on their own with traditional approaches. 

The study was funded by the British Heart Foundation, National Institute for Health Research, European Regional Development Fund and Barts Charity, and involved additional researchers from the Royal Free Hospital, Queen Mary University of London and the University of Leeds.


(Content and Image Courtesy: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2020/feb/ai-helps-predict-heart-attacks-and-stroke)



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