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May 03, 2019 Friday 02:22:08 PM IST

Ageing perception of time

Teacher Insights

A Duke University researcher, Adrian Bejan, has explainedas to why those endless days of childhood seemed to last so much longer than they do now - physics. The apparent temporal discrepancy can be blamed on the ever-slowing speed at which images are obtained and processed by the human brain as the body ages.The theory was published in the journal European Review.

In the aging human body, as tangled webs of nerves and neurons mature, they grow in size and complexity, leading to longer paths for signals to traverse. As those paths degrade with age, they give more resistance to the flow of electrical signals.

These phenomena cause the rate at which new mental images are acquired and processed to decrease with age. The eyes of infants move more often compared to adults as infants process images faster, acquiring and integrating more information.Older people are viewing fewer new images in the same amount of time.


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