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March 27, 2018 Tuesday 11:25:39 AM IST

Age is Not a Barrier: Says 88 Year Old Doctorate Hoder

International Edu News

Tokyo: Age is not a barrier, especially when it comes to education. Kiyoko Ozeki, an 88 year old woman from Japan has been awarded the doctorate, making her the oldest women to receive it in Japan. Kiyoko Ozeki is a visiting researcher at Ritsumeikan University.

Kiyoko received her doctorate for her thesis on origins and characteristics od cloth culture in ancient Japan.  

According to reports, Ozeki, born in Nagoya prefecture in 1929, was already 16 years old when the World War II ended and did not have the chance to go to a college.

After her divorce, she sold dolls to make a living and her craftsmanship got her a job at the women's junior college of Tokai Gakuen University, where she taught home economics as assist professor till 1995, according to reports.


During her teaching, she developed an interest in cloth of ancient Japan's Jomon Period and spent over 30 years visiting some 165 historical sites of the Jomon Period across Japan and researching the characteristics and history of cloth of that period.

Ozeki became a visiting research at the Research Centre for Pan-Pacific Civilizations of Ritsumeikan University from April 2015 and submitted her thesis last September.




(Source: The Times of India)


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