National Edu News: Dr Harsh Vardhan Launches DST initiative SERB – POWER   |  Parent Interventions: World’s first scientoon book “Bye Bye Corona”on Coronavirus   |  Science Innovations: New research project on COVID-19 and misinformation  |  Leadership Instincts: Covid-19: McGill University provides job opportunities for students   |  Teacher Insights: McGill and Trafalgar School launch the CoLab  |  Parent Interventions: Prospective parents' mental health associated with premature births  |  Parent Interventions: Preparing your child for a COVID-19 test  |  Parent Interventions: How to decipher Covid-19 symptoms   |  Leadership Instincts: HKU launches “Rising Stars” Academic staff global recruitment campaign  |  Parent Interventions: Importance of investing resources in parent-child visitation programmes  |  National Edu News: ‘Electricity Access in India and Benchmarking Distribution Utilities’ report  |  Leadership Instincts: Dr Satish Mishra bags "DrTulsi Das Chugh Award-2020"  |  Technology Inceptions: Machine learning comes of age in cystic fibrosis   |  Leadership Instincts: YANA celebrates its 10th anniversary  |  Leadership Instincts: Three educators celebrated at Penn GSE  |  
March 26, 2019 Tuesday 09:13:22 AM IST

ADHD Medications May Cause Psychosis

Teacher Insights

A new research study in New England Journal of Medicine has revealed that certain medications used to treat ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) may cause psychosis in teenager and adults.

 

The finding is based on an analysis of 13 to 25 year olds. ADHD medication was found to increase chances of developing delusional disorder, depressive disorder, hallucinations among others. The study notes that patients diagnosed with ADHD has been increasing in the past 20 years. The use of amphetamines rather than methylphenidates was likely to cause psychosis, according to researchers at Harvard Medical School and McLean Hospital.

Many parents are worried about children developing ADHD and not able to concentrate or sit quietly for some time. However, new research reveals that medication may not be good in the long run and hence both physicians, psychologists need to explore non-medical options where possible to treat ADHD.


Source: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1813751

Comments