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March 26, 2019 Tuesday 09:13:22 AM IST

ADHD Medications May Cause Psychosis

Teacher Insights

A new research study in New England Journal of Medicine has revealed that certain medications used to treat ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) may cause psychosis in teenager and adults.

 

The finding is based on an analysis of 13 to 25 year olds. ADHD medication was found to increase chances of developing delusional disorder, depressive disorder, hallucinations among others. The study notes that patients diagnosed with ADHD has been increasing in the past 20 years. The use of amphetamines rather than methylphenidates was likely to cause psychosis, according to researchers at Harvard Medical School and McLean Hospital.

Many parents are worried about children developing ADHD and not able to concentrate or sit quietly for some time. However, new research reveals that medication may not be good in the long run and hence both physicians, psychologists need to explore non-medical options where possible to treat ADHD.


Source: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1813751

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