Technology Inceptions: Caffeine to Boost Performance of Solar Cells  |  Teacher Insights: Diet-brain linkage   |  Teacher Insights: Rocking boosts sleep, memory  |  Science Innovations: New tech for infrared cameras   |  Science Innovations: Neuronal receptor’s cue   |  Policy Indications: School Students Can Effectively Use Social Media for Collaborative Learning  |  Technology Inceptions: Thermosets, the Most Widely Used Plastics May Be Made Recyclable  |  Parent Interventions: Food Additive Propionate May Increase Risk of Diabetes  |  Parent Interventions: Children Conceived After Short Duration of Marriage At Risk of Schizophrenia  |  Parent Interventions: Babbling Help Babies In Language Development  |  Technology Inceptions: Tissue Chips in Space Program To Help in Disease Research  |  Science Innovations: Aerospace material from polymer  |  Science Innovations: Way to boost drug potency  |  Teacher Insights: Short Rest Intervals Help May Improve Memory and Learning  |  Parent Interventions: Constipation In Children May be Caused by Difference in Sensory Processing  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

March 18, 2019 Monday 02:22:59 PM IST
Acting Less Demanding Than Being Our 'Self'

A new research finding by neuroscientists have shown that acting reduces brain activity compared to being our own 'self'.

In a study done using functional MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) by neuroscientists Ye Yuan, Steven Brown and Peter Cockett, it was found that acting a role led to decrease in brain activity especially in the cortical midline network of the frontal lobe.  The university students who became volunteers in the study were trained in method acting. They responded to a series of hypothetical questions acting as Romeo (boys) and Juliet (girls) in the Shakespeare's drama. Character portrayal in a drama or movie causes 'loss of self' thus shutting off parts of the brain.

People play different roles in life-mother, homemaker, daughter, professional role or father, son, son-in-law, job roles but they are different from acting in a drama or movie where you adopt the behaviour, emotions and gestures of the character assigned to you. The new research underscores the importance of examining method acting and its influence on our brain activities and how best it can be used for improving learning processes.

Source: https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsos.181908

Comments