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January 24, 2020 Friday 12:17:19 PM IST

Academic Success Linked to Genes, Family Income

Teacher Insights

A study done by University of York found that academic success of students is dependent on inherited DNA differences. Only 47% of children in the study sample with a high genetic propensity for education but a poorer background made it to university, compared with 62% with a low genetic propensity but parents that are more affluent. The researchers found that children with a high genetic propensity for education who were also from wealthy and well-educated family backgrounds had the greatest advantage with 77% going to University. Meanwhile, only 21% of children from families with low socioeconomic status and low genetic propensity carried on into higher education. and socio-economic status of parents. However, having genes alone cannot ensure success if parents can't afford quality education for the child. The findings of the study may help to identify children most at risk of poor educational outcomes, the researchers suggest.The study looked at data from 5,000 children born in the UK between 1994 and 1996.  The researchers analysed their test results at key stages of their education as well as their parents’ educational level and occupational status.

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