Policy Indications: Madhya Pradesh Launches Startup Programme 2022  |  Cover Story: Elimination Round or Aptitude Test- How to Align CUET with NEP 2020 Goals  |  Art & Literature: Song of the Rain- Monsoon in Literature, Journalism and Films  |  Life Inspirations: Master of a Dog House  |  Education Information: Climate Predictions: Is it all a Piffle!  |  Best Practices: Project Manzil Inspires Young Girls to Seek Aspiring Careers  |  Leadership Instincts: Raj Mashruwala Establishes CfHE Vagbhata Chair in Medical Devices at IITH   |  Parent Interventions: 10 Tricks to Help You Prepare for This Year's IB Chemistry Test  |  National Edu News: TiHAN supports a Chair for Prof Srikanth Saripalli at IIT Hyderabad  |  Teacher Insights: How To Build Competitive Mindset in Children Without Stressing Them  |  Parent Interventions: What Books Children Must Read this Summer Vacation   |  Policy Indications: CUET Mandatory for Central Universities  |  Teacher Insights: Classroom Dialogue for a Better World  |  Rajagiri Round Table: Is Time Ripe for Entrepreneurial Universities in India?  |  Life Inspirations: How to Overcome Fear of Public Speaking  |  
August 20, 2018 Monday 04:22:42 PM IST

Academic grouping of students could be easily prejudiced

Teacher Insights

Social psychologists warn against the possibility that educational tracking or grouping students based on their achievement levels could turn unjust. Evaluators beware! You could be easily tempted inadvertently to assign an able low socioeconomic status (SES) pupil into a lower trackand offer a higher track more suitable for a high-SES pupil. The results of the study undertaken by the researchers of Université de Lausanne, Switzerlandis published in the journalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin, published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

"Our research suggests that the selection required by the tracking system may lead evaluators to artificially create academic differences among students, as a function of their socio-economic status," says Anatolia Batruch one of four researchers associated with this report.

Batruch and colleagues want to further explore the expectations of the evaluators, which again could be colored by the "selective practice of tracking."


 

Comments