Teacher Insights: Know about how to choose the best MPPSC coaching institute  |  National Edu News: Swinburne University of Technology & IIT H launch the joint doctoral program  |  Policy Indications: India & Japan collaborations for innovations on Hydrogen based technologies  |  National Edu News: Education Minister addresses at the Annual Convocation of IIM Rohtak  |  Education Information: UPSC postpones tests and Interviews of some examinations  |  National Edu News: Piyush Goyal launches the Startup India Seed Fund Scheme  |  Teacher Insights: Are you Proficient in English?  |  National Edu News: National climate vulnerability assessment sees 8 states as highly vulnerable  |  National Edu News: Education minister e-launches long-lasting hygiene product DuroKea Series  |  National Edu News: Punjab’s new nutrient rich crop varieties can satisfy India's nutritional needs   |  Guest Column: Delicious Dhabas  |  International Edu News: 2D Perovskites for Solar Cells and LEDS  |  International Edu News: AI Model for Predicting Tsunami  |  International Edu News: Wearable Sweat Sensors on a Bandage  |  International Edu News: Smallest High Resolution Microscope  |  
August 20, 2018 Monday 04:22:42 PM IST

Academic grouping of students could be easily prejudiced

Teacher Insights

Social psychologists warn against the possibility that educational tracking or grouping students based on their achievement levels could turn unjust. Evaluators beware! You could be easily tempted inadvertently to assign an able low socioeconomic status (SES) pupil into a lower trackand offer a higher track more suitable for a high-SES pupil. The results of the study undertaken by the researchers of Université de Lausanne, Switzerlandis published in the journalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin, published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

"Our research suggests that the selection required by the tracking system may lead evaluators to artificially create academic differences among students, as a function of their socio-economic status," says Anatolia Batruch one of four researchers associated with this report.

Batruch and colleagues want to further explore the expectations of the evaluators, which again could be colored by the "selective practice of tracking."


 

Comments