Technology Inceptions: NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory back in action  |  Science Innovations: GenNext Solar Cells with Record-breaking efficiency invented  |  Science Innovations: Canadian researchers develop world’s fastest camera   |  Science Innovations: Scientists discover “ultra-stripped supernova”, the origin of gold and platinum   |  Parent Interventions: Why do bees stop buzzing during a total solar eclipse?   |  Parent Interventions: Lie detection is not an easy task  |  Teacher Insights: Can we learn while sleeping?  |  Teacher Insights: Sitting up straight boosts math performance  |  Science Innovations: Engineers design molecules that store thermal energy   |  Technology Inceptions: Russia May Bring Forward Manned Launch After Rocket Failure  |  Technology Inceptions: New Nokia Smartphone's India Launch Expected Today, how to Watch Live Stream  |  Science Innovations: Kahne Lab prepares to combat superbugs   |  Teacher Insights: False beliefs die hard  |  Science Innovations: New wayto convert metals to superconductors  |  Technology Inceptions: Willmott Dixon Trials 'Bionic' Vest  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board

September 19, 2018 Wednesday 12:49:31 PM IST
A novel method to extent your transient happiness

In modern times, many try to draw happiness through luxurious vacation, a good movie or a tasty dinner at a restaurant. However, the experience of happiness remains more often short-lived. How to extend these feelings of enjoyment? Researchers from the University of Minnesota and Texas A&M University have shown that the way people frame their goals for an experience influences how much happiness they glean from the experience over time. The results are published in Journal of Consumer Psychology.

"Our findings suggest that people can change the amount of happiness they get out of an experience," says Rohini Ahluwalia, the author of the study. "A general happiness goal can leave a longer-lasting positive emotional imprint."

This can apply to material purchases like a new car or dress as well as experiential purchases like spending money on vacation or a new music album.

Given that short-lived happiness after experiences is such a common phenomenon, this is an important step in stretching that timeline, concludes the study.

DOI: 10.1002/jcpy.1042

Comments