Teacher Insights: Access to SWAYAM and other digital initiatives goes up  |  Policy Indications: Major relief measures for power sector  |  Education Information: Kerala Government postpones KEAM Entrance Exam 2020  |  Policy Indications: COVID-19: UNICEF continues to ship vital supplies to affected countries   |  International Edu News: WHO Director-General calls on G20 to Fight, Unite, and Ignite against COVID-19  |  Education Information: WHO WhatsApp health alert launches in Arabic, French and Spanish  |  National Edu News: SJVN provides Rs 1 Cr for buying ventilators  |  Science Innovations: DST launches nationwide exercise to map & boost Covid19 solutions   |  National Edu News: Officers and staff of MNRE working from Home through e-office platform  |  National Edu News: Doordarshan to bring back famed Ramayan on Doordarshan National  |  Best Practices: Post Offices provide basic postal and financial services during COVID-19 lockdown  |  Leadership Instincts: Covid-19: Minister directs Kendriya Vidyalaya Sangathan to provide buildings   |  Education Information: National Testing Agency Postpones NEET UG May-2020  |  Leadership Instincts: Fight Corona IDEAthon   |  International Edu News: UK PM Boris Johnson tests positive for coronavirus  |  
February 17, 2020 Monday 11:33:18 AM IST

A major milestone in genetic research

Science Innovations

New research brings combined computational and laboratory genome engineering a step closer following the design of smaller and smaller genomes, to advance genetic manipulation, using supercomputers by researchers at the University of Bristol. Genomes are the complete set of genes or genetic material within a cell or organism. These building blocks of DNA are quantified by counting their number of base pairs. The size of genomes can be vast and vary across different types of organisms, from a bacterium with 160,000 base pairs (Carsonella ruddi) to humans, with three billion base pairs (Homo sapiens).  Genetic variety is still being explored and gene functions understood within biology.

By minimising genomes, researchers can understand better what each gene does within a cell.  Previous genetic research has created smaller genomes that can be chemically grown within the lab (Hutchison III et al.,). However, the research published today [11 February] in Nature Communications has found a way to design a smaller genome, using a computer to do it.

Computational methods for designing genomes are scarce.  However, algorithms run on Bristol's supercomputers have allowed the researchers to design a genome which is smaller, simpler, and can be easily manipulated. The research team tested designs within a computerised cell model to see if the cells are able to grow and divide. The researchers plan to apply designs like these within real cells in the future. This will allow them to discover how advanced this technology really is.

Making smaller genomes with a computer can contribute to researchers' understanding of their properties and using computational methods to manipulate genetics is a technological step forward.


The research highlights the powerful potential of computer designing genomes, which can be manipulated for varying purposes. However, as with other genetic technological advancements, there is a need for ethical oversight.  With new technological power comes new responsibilities.

(Content Courtesy: https://www.bristol.ac.uk/news/2020/february/genomes.html)

Comments