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May 18, 2018 Friday 11:26:35 AM IST

9 Things Good Leaders Never Say

Leadership Instincts

The leader plays a major role in an employee's attitude towards work. A leader can cheer and motivate employees. At the same time, a negative attitude form the leader can destroy the total productivity of the team too. Here are certain things a leader should never say to the team mate.

1. “I don’t have time right now.”

Yes, a leader is constantly busy. Tasks and meetings never end, but you should always make time to answer an employee’s question. If an employee is constantly told, “Now is not a good time,” or “Come back later,” they will stop asking questions. Always have time for your employees. If you are in the middle of something, schedule a definitive time to address their question ASAP.

2. “Because that’s the way we’ve always done it.”


A strong leader should never shrug off an employee’s suggestions by saying something is the way it has always been done. Strong leaders should listen and think with an open mind. If they genuinely believe an employee’s suggestion is no good, they should take the time to explain why. Strong leaders should be open to suggestions at any point in time and be happy to implement changes for the better.

3. “What were you thinking?”

A strong leader should never ask their employee, “What were you thinking?” Employees make mistakes, and it’s important to allow them to learn from those mistakes rather than blame them. When you critique an employee in a harsh or passive aggressive way, the only thing they’ll learn is to play it safe rather than play to win. 

4. “Here, let me do it.”


Some leaders to tend to complete the work of the team mates. Whether it is polishing their work, editing or making it error- free, the leader should understand that the practice is nothing but a vain exercise. You should give the employee the chance to correct and improve themselves. 

5. “Employee X does this better than you.”

Comparing employees to one another is one of the fastest ways to turn work relationships into rivalries. Internal competition should be healthy, not spiteful. A company’s management team should be wary of suggesting peers are better than each other. Strong leaders make it a point to acknowledge accomplishments without insulting everyone else.

6. “You don’t understand.”


Everyone knows effective leaders only hire smart people, but telling them later that they don’t understand something demeans their intelligence. Not only does this damage morale, but it also shuts them down before you get insight into the situation. A strong leader realises that if there are misunderstandings on their team, it’s their job to open up a dialogue and make everything clear.

7. “Your individual performance can sink the company.”

One of the most toxic things a strong leader should never say to an employee is that his or her individual performance can sink the company. Instead, strong leaders promote teamwork and the idea that each team member contributes in his or her own unique way to the overall performance of the company. Employees should never be made to feel the pressure of carrying an entire company on their shoulders.

8. “You’re not as driven as you used to be.”


Telling someone they have lost their spark will rarely heighten their desire to work hard for you. By putting them down, professionally and personally, you will likely get a negative response, and possibly even lose their respect. 

9. “Because I said so.”

There should always be a reason you’re asking someone on your team to do something. A strong leader trusts their employees and allows for enough transparency to help them understand how a request or idea ties back to the company’s mission.

(Indebted to various sources)



What is your take on a leader who constantly criticises the team players?