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June 15, 2020 Monday 01:59:30 PM IST

3-D Printed Capsules and Targeted Drug Delivery using Magnetic Fields

Image by S.Hermann and F.Ritcher

Scientists and engineers at University of Sussex and the University of Texas have developed a triggerable and remotely controllable system for on-demand drug delivery. The method involves using 3D printed capsule controlled by magnetic fields for targetted drug delivery. Soon it will be possibel to drive the drug delivery system towards the required position in the body using external means such as permanent magnets.The technology would allow for a drug to be applied close to the lesion.The researchers foresee that the targeted delivery offered by the new system could help eliminate harmful side effects caused by treatments like chemotherapy which damage neighbouring healthy cells. The device also offers a level of control that would guard against inappropriate dosing which has become the main cause of adverse effects from drug therapy.In the study, to be published in the August edition of Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, a device containing anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil and composed of a magnetic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sponge cylinder and a 3D printed reservoir showed an inhibition effect on Trex cell growth.Repeated, localised drug release was achieved by switching the applied magnetic field on and off. Varying the intensity of the magnetic field when applied to the device causes the internal magnetic sponge to be compressed at different ratios, which releases different amounts of the drug. In vitro cell culture studies demonstrated the stronger the magnetic field applied, the higher the drug release and the greater inhibition effects on Trex cell growth. The researchers say that this kind of smart treatment could be available for patients in hospitals within a decade.

More details:https://archive-stage.sussex.ac.uk/news/press-releases/id/52210



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